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Value and challenges of lung ultrasound in stratifying ST-elevation myocardial infarction risk

In the progress of cardiovascular medicine, non-invasive diagnostic modalities are gaining power for their ability to offer valuable insights without invasive procedures. One such technique, lung ultrasound (LUS), is rising to importance for its potential to clarify the complex pathophysiology of heart failure (HF) and offer valuable insights into patient management.1 One cardiovascular disorder that could particularly benefit from the advancement in LUS is ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), a severe form of ischaemic cardiovascular disease that continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.2 The traditional risk stratification methods for STEMI, although indispensable, often fall short in identifying patients at high risk of adverse outcomes, leading to an unmet need for new prognostic markers. As a tool capable of early detection of subclinical HF, LUS appears to have the potential to fill this gap. With its ability to provide real-time detection of pulmonary congestion, LUS offers a window into the subclinical stages of HF, making it a promising candidate for improving the prognosis and management of patients with STEMI. As such, the role of LUS in the management of patients with STEMI appears to be on a course of rapid scaling. Its ability to provide immediate, dynamic data and to reduce diagnostic uncertainties makes it an invaluable asset in the current healthcare landscape.

In this study, Carreras-Mora et al analysed the prognostic value of detecting B-lines (a sonographic sign of lung congestion) via LUS in patients with Killip class I STEMI.3 The results showed that subclinical congestion detected by LUS was associated with higher risk of adverse outcomes such …